Free Shipping on orders more than $70!
Home / Health / How is Immunity & Mental Health Connected to the Gut-Brain Axis?
How is Immunity & Mental Health Connected to the Gut-Brain Axis?

How is Immunity & Mental Health Connected to the Gut-Brain Axis?

Did you know that you have more than one brain? In recent years, scientists and researchers have discovered that the bacteria in our gut acts like a “little brain” that influences not only our gut health but also our cognitive health. While research is still in its infancy, scientists have discovered that mental health issues and cognitive impairment could be more complicated than just an issue in our brain. However, this also means that we may have more solutions to treat those suffering from mental health issues.

What is the Gut Microbiome?

Our microbiome is vast and intricate. While it was once thought that the bacteria in our gut was just responsible for aiding digestion, scientists are now realizing that our microbiome does so much more. The human microbiome is “all microorganisms in the human body and their respective genetic material”. (1) There are about 100 trillion bacteria in our intestines that outnumber our own cells ten to one. (2) The main role this bacteria plays in our gastrointestinal tract is aiding digestion, breaking down nutrients, working with our immune system, as well as communicating with the brain. (3)

The Gut-Brain Axis

The communication between our gut microbiome and our brain is called the Gut-Brain Axis.Scientists have discovered that our gastrointestinal tract has its own neural network with nerve cells lining the entire tract from mouth to rectum. (4) In addition, our gut produces neurotransmitters that influence our brain chemistry. For example, serotonin, a neurotransmitter largely responsible for regulating depression and anxiety, is produced mainly in the gut. (5) Conversely, our gut bacteria responds to these neurotransmitters just like our brain does which means that our brain influences our gut bacteria as well. (6) If our gut is happy, our brain will be happy and vice versa.

The connection between our gut and brain can have a profound impact on our physical and mental health. Inflammation in our gut can lead to holes in our intestinal lining called leaky gut.Our immune system responds to gut inflammation by attacking the digestive tract causing even more holes in our intestinal lining. Food particles and pathogens can then seep into our bloodstream, enter our central nervous system, and even pass through the blood-brain barrier. (7) Scientists have discovered that this process can trigger autoimmune diseases which is when the immune system continually attacks certain areas of the body. (8) Furthermore, chronic inflammation and an overactive immune system has been correlated with mental health disorders.(9) Our gastrointestinal system sends signals to our brain that can alter our mood and can cause disorders such as bipolar, depression, and schizophrenia. (10) Not only that, but stress can change the bacteria makeup of our gut making us susceptible to illness and, like a feedback loop, more susceptible to mental health issues. (11)

What Can You Do?

“Our intestinal bacteria is profoundly shaped by our dietary habits.”

- (12)

Changes in dietary habits can mitigate autoimmune conditions and even may reverse them. (13) Our microbiome is largely influenced by what we are consuming. Eating clean, organic, and non-processed foods and supplements, while minimizing added sugar and alcohol consumption, can profoundly improve your gut health. Scientists are also discovering that various forms of therapy, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, can calm the mind and ease gut issues. (14)

One exciting discovery is that scientists have found that probiotics can play a huge role in healing the gut and boosting cognitive health. While more research needs to be conducted, scientists are finding that probiotics help reduce inflammation, prevent neural dysfunction, and can reduce cortisol levels thereby decreasing anxiety and depression. In fact, probiotics may have a similar effect as antidepressants! (15)

Living Alchemy is committed to formulating the best clean supplements for your gut and full body health! We created Your Flora SYMBIOTICS, a fermented, whole food delivery of probiotics, prebiotics, enzymes, and nutrients, to give you everything you need to heal your gut and get back to feeling your best. In addition, we have our ALIVE Series of fermented adaptogens to help you adapt to stress and anxiety so that you can experience mental calm and an uplifted mood. Finally, we created WISDOM, a powerhouse of fermented herbs and lion’s mane mushroom, to help boost your cognition, repair cognitive damage and keep you sharp!

For more details on Living Alchemy’s fermented, whole food supplements, please visit our website or send as an email at info@livingalchemy.ca.

Take our Quiz to find your complete digestive solution!

References:

  1. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020
  2. Carpenter, Siri. September 2012. That gut feeling. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling Accessed April 17, 2020.
  3. John Hopkins Medicine. The Brain-Gut Connection. John Hopkins Medicine. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-brain-gut-connection Accessed April 18, 2020.
  4. John Hopkins Medicine. The Brain-Gut Connection. John Hopkins Medicine. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-brain-gut-connection Accessed April 18, 2020.
  5. Carpenter, Siri. September 2012. That gut feeling. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling Accessed April 17, 2020.
  6. Carpenter, Siri. September 2012. That gut feeling. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling Accessed April 17, 2020.
  7. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020.
  8. Wekerle, Hartmut. December 2016. The gut–brain connection: triggering of brain autoimmune disease by commensal gut bacteria. Rheumatology. https://academic.oup.com/rheumatology/article/55/suppl_2/ii68/2892202 Accessed April 17, 2020.
  9. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020.
  10. McQuillan, Susan. Nov 18, 2018. The Gut Brain Connection: How Gut Health Affects Mental Health. PSYCOM. https://www.psycom.net/the-gut-brain-connection Accessed April 18, 2020.
  11. Carpenter, Siri. September 2012. That gut feeling. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling Accessed April 17, 2020.
  12. Wekerle, Hartmut. December 2016. The gut–brain connection: triggering of brain autoimmune disease by commensal gut bacteria. Rheumatology. https://academic.oup.com/rheumatology/article/55/suppl_2/ii68/2892202 Accessed April 17, 2020.
  13. John Hopkins Medicine. The Brain-Gut Connection. John Hopkins Medicine. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-brain-gut-connection Accessed April 18, 2020.
  14. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020.
  15. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020.

Qu’est-ce que le microbiome intestinal?

Votre microbiome est vaste et complexe. En effet, alors que l’on croyait que les bactéries de l’intestin jouaient seulement un rôle lors de la digestion, les scientifiques réalisent que le microbiome fait beaucoup plus que cela. Le microbiome humain représente "tous les micro-organismes du corps humain ainsi que leur matériel génétique respectif." (1) Il y a environ 100 trilliards de bactéries dans vos intestins, ce qui est dix fois plus que vos propres cellules. (2) Les bactéries dans votre tractus gastro-intestinal participent à la digestion, décomposent les aliments en nutriments, assistent le système immunitaire et communiquent avec le cerveau. (3)

L'axe intestin-cerveau

La communication entre votre microbiome intestinal et votre cerveau s’appelle l'axe intestin-cerveau. Des scientifiques ont découvert que votre tractus gastro-intestinal a son propre réseau neuronal bordé de cellules nerveuses tout au long du tractus, soit de la bouche jusqu'au rectum. (4) De plus, votre intestin produit des neurotransmetteurs qui influencent la chimie de votre cerveau. Par exemple, la sérotonine, neurotransmetteur qui joue un rôle important lors de dépression et d'anxiété, est produite en majorité dans l'intestin. (5) Et réciproquement, les bactéries de votre intestin réagissent à ces neurotransmetteurs. Ce qui signifie que votre cerveau influence aussi vos bactéries intestinales. (6) Si votre intestin est heureux, votre cerveau sera heureux et vice-versa. C’est une communication bidirectionnelle.

La connexion entre votre intestin et votre cerveau peut avoir un impact majeur sur votre santé physique et mentale. Une inflammation chronique dans l'intestin peut, avec le temps, créer des trous dans la paroi intestinale, occasionnant ce qu’on appelle le " syndrome de l'intestin perméable ". Votre système immunitaire va finir par réagir à cette inflammation intestinale en attaquant la voie digestive ce qui peut causer encore plus de dommage à votre paroi intestinale. Des particules alimentaires et des pathogènes peuvent alors pénétrer le système sanguin, accéder au système nerveux central et même passer à travers la barrière hémato-encéphalique. (7) Des scientifiques ont découverts que ce processus peut déclencher des maladies auto-immunes, qui fait en sorte que le système immunitaire attaque constamment certaines parties du corps. (8) Par ailleurs une inflammation chronique doublée d’un système immunitaire hyperactif sont corrélés aux troubles de santé mentale. (9) Votre système gastrointestinal envoie des signaux à votre cerveau qui peuvent modifier votre humeur et causer des troubles tels que la bipolarité, la dépression et la schizophrénie. (10) Mais pas seulement cela, car le stress peut aussi transformer la composition bactérienne de votre intestin ce qui vous rend par le fait même, plus susceptible aux maladies mentales. (11)

Que pouvez-vous faire?

« Nos bactéries intestinales (microbiote intestinal) sont profondément façonnées par nos habitudes alimentaires »

- (12)

Des changements alimentaires peuvent atténuer les maladies auto-immunes et même les renverser. (13) Votre microbiome est en grande partie influencé par ce que vous consommez. Ainsi manger des aliments sains, biologiques et non transformés, ajouter des suppléments, tout en réduisant le sucre ajouté et la consommation d'alcool, peuvent énormément améliorer votre santé intestinale. Des scientifiques ont aussi découvert qu'une variété de thérapies, telle que la thérapie comportementale cognitive, peuvent apaiser l'esprit et les troubles intestinaux. (14)

Des scientifiques ont trouvé que des probiotiques peuvent jouer un rôle important dans la guérison de l'intestin et stimuler la santé cognitive, voilà une découverte excitante. Malgré le fait que d'autres recherches doivent encore être faites, des scientifiques ont découvert que des probiotiques aident à réduire l'inflammation et à prévenir le dysfonctionnement neuronal et ils peuvent réduire les niveaux de cortisone, diminuant ainsi l'anxiété et la dépression. En fait, les probiotiques ont peut-être des effets similaires aux anti-dépresseurs! (15)

Living Alchemy s'engage à formuler les meilleurs suppléments propres pour votre intestin et la santé de votre corps! Nous avons créé le Symbiotique Votre Flore, un mélange de probiotiques, prébiotiques, enzymes et nutriments faits d’aliments entiers fermentés, pour vous donner tout ce dont vous avez besoin afin de soigner votre intestin et vous sentir mieux. De plus, nous avons notre Gamme VIVANT, composée d'adaptogènes fermentés pour vous aider à gérer votre stress et votre anxiété, et vous amener dans un état de calme mental et de bonne humeur. Finalement, nous avons formulé SAGESSE, un mélange puissant d’herbes fermentées auquel nous avons ajouté du champignon hydne hérisson « crinière de lion » pour aider à maintenir votre santé cognitive, réparer les dommages cognitifs et vous garder ‘’allumé’’!

Pour plus de détails sur les suppléments d’aliments entiers fermentés de Living Alchemy, visitez notre site internet ou envoyez-nous un courriel à info@livingalchemy.ca. Nous serons heureux de discuter avec vous pour vous expliquer comment vous pouvez prendre soin de votre intestin et votre esprit avec des aliments entiers fermentés!

Références:

  1. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020
  2. Carpenter, Siri. September 2012. That gut feeling. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling Accessed April 17, 2020.
  3. John Hopkins Medicine. The Brain-Gut Connection. John Hopkins Medicine. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-brain-gut-connection Accessed April 18, 2020.
  4. John Hopkins Medicine. The Brain-Gut Connection. John Hopkins Medicine. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-brain-gut-connection Accessed April 18, 2020.
  5. Carpenter, Siri. September 2012. That gut feeling. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling Accessed April 17, 2020.
  6. Carpenter, Siri. September 2012. That gut feeling. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling Accessed April 17, 2020.
  7. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020.
  8. Wekerle, Hartmut. December 2016. The gut–brain connection: triggering of brain autoimmune disease by commensal gut bacteria. Rheumatology. https://academic.oup.com/rheumatology/article/55/suppl_2/ii68/2892202 Accessed April 17, 2020.
  9. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020.
  10. McQuillan, Susan. Nov 18, 2018. The Gut Brain Connection: How Gut Health Affects Mental Health. PSYCOM. https://www.psycom.net/the-gut-brain-connection Accessed April 18, 2020.
  11. Carpenter, Siri. September 2012. That gut feeling. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling Accessed April 17, 2020.
  12. Wekerle, Hartmut. December 2016. The gut–brain connection: triggering of brain autoimmune disease by commensal gut bacteria. Rheumatology. https://academic.oup.com/rheumatology/article/55/suppl_2/ii68/2892202 Accessed April 17, 2020.
  13. John Hopkins Medicine. The Brain-Gut Connection. John Hopkins Medicine. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-brain-gut-connection Accessed April 18, 2020.
  14. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020.
  15. Clapp, Megan. Sept 15, 2017. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. NCBI. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ Accessed April 17, 2020.